Writing Proposals That Sell

Convert Proposals into Sales

Make More Money

The title of this program contains the three important parts of the program -Writing, Proposals and Selling.

If you are in sales, you are probably proud of the company you work for and the products or services you sell. In your own modest way, you are probably proud of your sales skills and your success.

This program shows you how to include writing skills as a clear example of your selling skills. The proposals you write become a “product” you want your clients and customers to buy.

Sadly, many people do not understand the difference between a proposal, a price quote, an informational brochure, a spec sheet or a response to a request for proposal. Not truly understanding what a proposal is and not knowing how to create an effective one combine to produce wasted time and erosion of image.

The third component – selling – is often neglected in proposals.

Proposals actually sell for you when you are not in front of your clients.

Do you want to gamble sales on proposals that do not live up to the pride you take in your company, your products or services and yourself?

What is your closing ratio with proposals telling you about the quality and power of your proposals?

Design a program that will help your sales team increase their sales and your corporate profits.

Which of the following areas will benefit your team the most?

  • How to save time with proposal writing
  • 9 things a proposal is not
  • 15 qualities of successful proposals
  • 13 skills needed to create successful proposals
  • 5 qualities of effective transmittal letters
  • 3 key elements of a proposal
  • The role of rapport in proposal writing
  • What is and is not a proposal
  • The differences between “features” and “benefits”
  • How to find your reader’s “hot Buttons”
  • Six types of questions and when to ask them
  • How to match proposal components to achieve results
  • Phrases Not to use in a proposal
  • How to organize the data
  • How to proofread for content and message
  • How to measure the success of your document
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